JavaScript must be enabled in order for you to see "WP Copy Data Protect" effect. However, it seems JavaScript is either disabled or not supported by your browser. To see full result of "WP Copy Data Protector", enable JavaScript by changing your browser options, then try again.
The end is another start

The end is another start

The rail seems to extend as far as we could imagine otherwise over a period of our lifetime. Some people say it symbolizes the development of the society by reducing geographical isolations while others complain that it just seemingly brings us closer and in fact tears us apart. The stories taking place on the trains are from and beyond our imagine. Passengers get on and off continuously without break, starting or ending their lives along the way. Backing home with accomplishments or heading to a new place with hopes, I could just wish our lives blossom and flourish with the whistles of the trains. While I am on the train, I always seem to become a girl of deep reflection. With thousands of paradoxical coming and going in my mind, I have finally figured out nothing and found I myself was a paradox. Gradually, I realized that there is no answer for the paradox and ambiguity of the society and we do not need any coordinated approaches to the problems. We could naturally conduct our life agreeably in any situations by keep going like a tireless train. After all, it is us who are powering it up. The end is another start. This is the most wonderful part of a trip on the train that I could expect so far, either traveling with a lover or strangers is not really...
“For you, a thousand times over” Survive Nepal Earthquake-3

“For you, a thousand times over” Survive Nepal Earthquake-3

Emerging from a long, deep sleep, relief surged through me and the day of the Nepal earthquake began to pass before my eyes automatically. It was a cooler-than-usual noon for April in Kathmandu with heavy clouds in sky and a gusty breeze bringing a nip to the air. I was about to check out of the hotel in Thamel, standing on the second floor of a five-story apartment, I suddenly heard a throaty rumble and felt a ripple beneath me. With a certain reluctance to conjure up any disasters, It did took me a couple of seconds longer to understand why people were yelling out “earthquake”. Before having time to think about moving or not, I had been dragged down onto the bottom floor by a Nepali boy with a rude yet generous manner, he then urged me desperately cover my head with hands while leaning against a swaying pillar to control the trembling in his body. Until now, I could still feel the concrete slab floor rising up and down and had an acute sense of waiting for the ceiling falling in chunks on our heads. For a moment everyone seemed to have been deprived of the power of speech, forming the opening syllables first of one word, then of the other, over and over again as if we did not know which word we were going to say. As the voices of the praying for heaven’s mercy rose, I was just aware that I joined a huddle of men, surging forward to an open space of a plaza in Thamel. To be honest, I was not obviously...
A Letter to Ryo, Survive Nepal Earthquake-2

A Letter to Ryo, Survive Nepal Earthquake-2

Dear Ryo, Our flight eventually landed safely, and I’m currently staying at my friend’s 23-stories high apartment, which sounds extremely shocking at this moment when even settling at the bottom of the house could be a threaten to us.  Albeit it looked out of order, things in airport turned out to be going more smoothly than I deemed , from checking to boarding. We even landed about 50-minutes earlier than it should be, no any bother with delay happened to other flights. It might because you were there backing me up, and I would never forget the picture that you lifted my heave luggage up to the top of the taxi without saying a word.  To comfort myself, I thus decided to write and pass my blessing to you, this might be the mere thing I could do for a while. Obviously, It’s less helpful than what you have done for me.  Hopefully, I could make it up in the near future. So please stay safe and take care, which I have to say to you again and again even though I am quite sure you are strong enough to head to your next destination. Nepal is a truly home-like place from which we never tried to escape, but we have to put safety prior to other things for the responsibility we have to family and ourselves. Actually I even refused to give my parents a hug when they picked me up in the airport to conceal the fact that I was trembling. Believe it or not, I was just reading your article with my friends while hearing from you by last email. I felt extremely distressing looking at debris and...
Back to China, Survive Nepal Earthquake-1

Back to China, Survive Nepal Earthquake-1

As the death toll of Nepal earthquake rises, there are shortages in water, food, electricity, however, no lack of volunteers consisting of people who are actually struck by quake and suffering from aftershocks, to help with disaster relief, from pulling survivors from rubbles to pitching tents. In fact, I got a hot porridge the next morning of the quake from a Chinese volunteer. In spite of not being among people contributing to the effort, I managed to settle myself in a half meter wide mattress so that I would not take up too much space in a public tent. So far,  I have spent 3 wet and cold nights outside, hearing people coughing  and dogs barking, they did not interrupt my dream at all, they were the signs of life at this deadly moment and I would rather listen to all kinds of sounds as long as it’s not from the cawing of ravens, according to which, is a predictor of a coming aftershock. Since earthquake hit Nepal on noon Saturday when I was about to check out of a hotel in Thamel, central Kathmandu, people were camped in the open, the stores were closed, the hospital was overflowing, the power was off, and I am alive, albeit not in every nerve, energetic and dynamic enough to go back to my family and friends.  Currently, I am heading to airport, if there is no congestion keeps flight from parking, according to which some planes was forced to turn back, I would be home this eveving. I might even have a chance to have dinner with my closest friend Gingin who will...
The reality is far from that

The reality is far from that

I used to travel a lot but had yet to cross the national boundaries by the time when I was capturing the landscapes of a customs town, ZhangMu, located on the China-Tibet border. Traveling overseas seemed to be deleted from my wishlist automatically ever since I visited my Buddhist Master Tian Zhen and gradually released from the delusion of chasing happiness based on external factors. By digging increasingly deep into the philosophy of the Buddhism, I had been expected to be less attached to things otherwise than the teaching of the Buddha, however, it was not an attachment but an inherent pleasure. Fortunately, before crossing the boundary bridge between China and Nepal, I was informed that there was a declared national strike called by opposition parties in Kathmandu which was coming up in two days and would last for 3-5days, It was not yet too late for me to change my schedule at that time by jumping into my friend’s car and went back to Tibet so that I would not risk being accidentally or potentially injured by some conflicts. However,even more fortunately, I did not go away but opt to move forward all the way down to the central area of Kathmandu, and eventually relieved myself by insuring that I was much safer than I deemed. Even though the strike crippled life in Kathmandu by shutting down schools, markets and transportation according to the reports, it didn’t trouble me by any means from my first-hand experience. More often that not, there’s little if any threat when moving to a brand new place. I’m still apt to condition myself...
My Potala Girl

My Potala Girl

The shutter speed was up to 1/1250 of a second at that moment, but still not fast enough to capture her dramatic radiance. It’s very true that one can photograph the flower but not its fragrance, one can photograph the candle but not its light. Between me and her, a little Tibetan girl, I would rather say there was no camera and lens, but two pairs of eyes sparkled when looking at each other, though mine was not as bright as hers. Among all Tibetan people I once asked for permission to take a picture of them, this little girl was one of the handful willing to face my camera. In most cases, the Tibetan people politely refused my request but did not make me feel rejected at all. They were basically focusing on chanting sutras or turning the prayer wheel. They had not ignored “the little me”, but concentrated on “the great Buddha” instead. Coming back to this girl, I met her up before our departure of the holy Potala Palace. In fact, I was the last visitor to leave at that day. The guard almost lost his patience and pretended to be angry with me. Since I just knew that he would never freak out otherwise be rude to a pilgrim which I deeply believed I have been, I felt entirely comfortable and free to finish my photos with this girl. In a way, I have other chances to come back to Potala, but not to her, which makes our meet unique and precious. She was like the effulgent sun, shining through and standing behind the clouds...